Being convicted of a crime can affect your ability to find work, apply for a loan or rent an apartment, but how much would your situation improve if your criminal record was erased? Some states are performing mass expungements of some criminal offenses; for example, CNN reports that Illinois is expunging around 800,000 marijuana convictions after legalizing the substance. If you hope to get your criminal record sealed or erased, there are a few eligibility requirements you may want to learn about beforehand.

Before you can have your criminal record expunged, you may have to visit your local county courthouse’s criminal division to learn whether such actions are allowed in that sector. Generally, all states have some degree of expungement rules, but making local queries can be an effective way for you to begin the process.

The type of crime you committed may affect whether your records may be sealed. For example, if you committed a misdemeanor crime, such as petty larceny, your record may be eligible for expungement and your criminal record will be erased. However, not all crimes can be expunged, and felony charges may be difficult to clear, even after you have completed your sentence.

You may be allowed to have your criminal record expunged if you complete a court-ordered program, such as a drug or alcohol rehab. Some states, such as Tennessee, allow DUI convictions to be expunged if the charge was reduced in court.

The expungement of your criminal records may depend greatly on the charge and circumstances of the conviction. Some organizations may still be able to view your criminal record after expungement to determine employment eligibility.